StupidVeggieXmasThe holiday season is heavily associated with feasting on delicious food, but according to a new Cosmos article, we should also use this time to focus on good dietary health.

Cosmos is a literary science magazine published in Australia but sold internationally, and its website accumulates two million page views monthly. On December 1, the website posted the article “Season of good cheer – and guilt,” which was written by Norman Swan.


Read More

shutterstock_134323481Daily Life, a website with news and lifestyle content for Australian women, is among the many different media sources to write about advanced glycation end-products. It did so in its recent article “How to stay youthful, inside and out,” which was written by Paula Goodyer.

Goodyer wrote:

“We might think of Botox and cosmetic repair jobs as the big guns in the anti-ageing armoury, but how about a different approach – like picking up a set of dumb bells and putting down that bag of chips? There’s growing evidence that what we do to boost our health on the inside can improve how we look on the outside too.”


Read More

shutterstock_187423169The St. Louis Post-Dispatch recently featured an article stating that a healthy diet – one with low amounts of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) – is a key to healthy, great-looking skin.

Post-Dispatch Fashion Editor Debra D. Bass wrote the article, titled “Eat your way to beautiful skin.” She noted that glycation is one of the causes of poor skin:

“Excess sugar in your bloodstream attaches to proteins to form new molecules called advanced glycation end products (or … wait for it… AGEs for short). According to published studies, the more sugar you eat, the more AGEs you develop and the more likely you are to have inflammation. Inflammation can be a pesky internal condition that means your skin (among other vital organs) is more vulnerable.

And guess what’s most vulnerable to attack: collagen and elastin, the proteins most responsible for keeping your skin plump and youthful.”


Read More

By: Pat Baird, AGE Advisory Board

shutterstock_141950908As a dietitian, I am very conscious of how the foods we eat and the way we prepare them help determine the levels of Advanced Glycation End-products (AGEs) in our bodies. It’s important that everyone learns how to lower their AGE levels through their diet, and my goal is to help others accomplish that.

But AGEs are not solely a result of our diet. They are also a result of our lifestyle.

Inactivity is a key AGE accelerator. Without enough exercise, our AGE levels will climb higher and higher. We use protein and sugar when we exercise for energy and recovery, but when we are inactive, our bodies do not use that protein and sugar for their intended function. Instead, the excess protein and sugar combine to form harmful AGEs inside our bodies.


Read More


SPONSORS

diagnOptics morinda.com
truAge.com ageless_way
Twitter

Copyright 2012 AGE Foundation.
Top