skin_detailHealth and wellness advocates everywhere are calling for a massive reduction in general sugar intake, but their reasoning has nothing to do with weight-loss. Instead, articles insist that sugar’s main crime is its detrimental effects on the skin.

In a fascinating article published by Yahoo! Health, dermatologist Jill Waibel, MD, discusses the link between sugar and AGEs, and AGEs affect on the skin. She says:

“Eating too much sugar causes, a process that occurs when your body has excessive amount of sugar. This affects the normal function of your cells as the excess sugar molecules join together with protein molecules to create products that are foreign to your body, also known as advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Theses AGEs affect collagen and elastin, causing them to break down. As a result, wrinkles and lines form on your face.”


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women looking in mirrorAGEs naturally build up in our bodies over time, but diet and lifestyle choices can accelerate AGE accumulation and affect how quickly AGE damage manifests itself, including how quickly the effects can be seen on our skin.

Two recent articles explain how eating too much sugar increases the formation of AGEs and causes premature aging.


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Slow CookerEating a low-AGE diet doesn’t have to be boring or unsatisfying, and the Seattle Times did its part to demonstrate this with an article containing healthy recipes that can be prepared with a slow cooker.

The article is titled “Yummy slow-cooker recipes promote health, too.” It was written by Carrie Dennett, a registered dietitian nutritionist.


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Uribarri 2Mount Sinai Medical Center physician Dr. Jaime Uribarri, a member of the AGE Foundation’s advisory board, was cited in a recent article about a study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.

The article is titled, “New study postulates the role of dietary advanced glycation end products in the risk of Alzheimer’s disease.” The study in question provides evidence that cooking foods at high temperatures increases the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, thanks to advanced glycation end-products (AGEs).


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Cut_seasoned_steaksAdvanced glycation end-products (AGEs) have been discussed by many different types of publications, and now we can add acupuncture publications to that list.

That’s because Acupuncture Today recently published the article “Meat in the Middle: Teaching Your Patients About Meat Consumption.” With its website and magazine, Acupuncture Today claims to be the only complete news source in the acupuncture profession.

The article was written by Marlene Merritt, a licensed acupuncturist who runs a wellness center in Austin, Texas. Merritt discussed various aspects of eating meat, one of which was advanced glycation end-products, which she said “conveniently have an acronym that tells us what they do … (AGE).”


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shutterstock_109056116There is a seemingly never-ending stream of AGE-related articles in the media, with both print and online publications from all over the world educating readers about the harm that advanced glycation end-products can cause.

Many publications are talking about sugar in particular, and have stressed the importance of avoiding consuming too much sugar in our diet. The following are just a few examples that have appeared online recently.


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shutterstock_152698421Halloween and an overabundance of sweets are synonymous, but all those sweets could lead a truly scary situation – aging skin – according to a Scientific American article titled “Trick or treat … and wrinkles?

Julianne Wyrick, the author of the article, wrote:

“Mothers across the nation will likely be warning their costume-clad youngsters that they’ll ‘feel sick’ if they eat too much of the candy they collect tonight [on Halloween]. What they may not mention is that foods that raise blood sugar can also cause wrinkles, an effect dermatologist Rajani Katta calls ‘sugar sag.’”


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Pregnant Red DressA recent study has linked the consumption of fried foods by women pre-pregnancy to gestational diabetes (GDM), which is the development of high blood sugar during pregnancy despite no previous diabetes diagnosis. GDM disappears following birth, but women who suffer from it are seven times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes.

The study, which was published in the magazine Diabetologia (official journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes), caught the attention of many different publications. Among the websites to write about the study were Medical Daily, International Business Times, Food World News, Diabetes.co.uk, Lifehacker, The Telegraph, Irishhealth.com, Family Practice News, Healio, and Medical Xpress.


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GrossLookingFastFoodAccording to Food Consumer, scientists at the Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel in Brussels, Belgium conducted a review and confirmed that advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) contribute to various health issues.

Food Consumer is an online food, diet and health news outlet. It addressed the scientists’ findings in a recent article titled “Advanced glycation end products linked to chronic inflammation.”


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PeanutsWe’ve known for a long time that advanced glycation end-products have been linked to a wide variety of health issues, whether something minor like wrinkled skin or something serious like cancer and diabetes. But a recent study suggests that AGEs may also be the reason why some people suffer from peanut allergies.

The Economist just published an article titled “Browned off” about a paper published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. The paper details an Oxford University study conducted by Dr. Quentin Sattentau in which mice were found to be more likely to develop a peanut allergy in response to dry-roasted nuts than in response to raw ones.


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GirlChoppingTomatoIf you want to improve your health and appearance, various media sources have some advice for you: lower your advanced glycation end-product (AGE) levels.

More and more AGE-related articles have been popping up online in all regions of the world and on websites covering all sorts of topics. The following are some notable recent mentions of AGEs in the media.


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Skin Inc. describes itself as the leading industry publication for the professional skin care industry, and of course, one cannot be the leader in skin care without knowing all about advanced glycation end-products.

shutterstock_111283052Thus, Skin Inc. recently discussed AGEs in multiple articles. The company publishes a magazine for skin care facility owners and managers, and also features a weekly e-newsletter and a comprehensive website. Skin Inc. previously featured an AGE-related article in the November issue of its magazine last year.

As for its most recent AGE articles, the first was titled, “Clients With Tired, Puffy Eyes? Top Tips to More Youthful Eye Contours!


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1This time of the year is synonymous with education, since the new school year has started. Well, even if you aren’t in school anymore, there’s still the opportunity to receive a vital education in AGEs thanks to all the media coverage about these harmful compounds.

We’ve collected a sample of AGE articles from around the Internet:

Eat right, beauty (Deccan Herald): “Certain foods are bad for your skin and can make you look haggard and old. Fried, greasy, sugary foods, foods made of refined flour, foods that lack vegetables and fruits, and a diet that is largely dependent on pasta, bread and butter spells doom for your beauty.


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shutterstock_165369422It’s time for another roundup of AGE-related articles that have appeared online recently! These come from various parts of the world (the United States, United Kingdom and India) and from a variety of different sources.

The Strong Body, Strong Mind Connection (Before It’s News): “The control of blood sugar levels through the regular participation in exercise programs can also prevent advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) from forming. These AGE molecules can damage nerve cells and the connections between them, making normal brain function less likely.”


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OlderWomanTouchingFaceBig names in the world of media continue to validate what we know about advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), with Time being the latest media outlet to throw its hat into the ring (read about some other major media sources covering AGEs here).

Time has the world’s largest circulation of any weekly news magazine, with a readership of approximately 25 million. Its website just posted an article by Kiera Aaron titled “6 Foods That Can Age Your Skin.” It is a condensed version of an article titled “14 Foods That Make You Look Older,” which originally appeared on Health.com.


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NewspaperPileAGEs are everywhere! They’re in our food, in our bodies, and also in the media. And by media, we mean that they’re being written about by all sorts of publications around the world.

Whether they’re specifically all about advanced glycation end-products, or just feature brief mentions of glycation, it isn’t hard at all to find new articles mentioning AGEs.

So, below are just a small number of articles in recent months that mention AGEs.

These 4 Foods Will Dry Your Skin, Cause Wrinkles and Kill Cells (EmaxHealth): “When sugar gets inside [our] bodies, it attaches itself to other amino groups of the tissue proteins such as collagen and slowly turns them into advanced glycation end [products] (AGE). This is a major cause of damage to the body and risk of type 2 diabetes. As a result, healthy collagen fibers lose their elasticity and become rigid, more fragile and easily destroyed. This is where the sagging skin and wrinkles come from.”


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stack of toastAGE-related articles have been popping up in the media in countries all over the world lately, and now Malaysia can be added to that list.

The Star Online recently featured an article about advanced glycation end-products titled “Beware the Maillard baddies,” which was written by Chris Chan.

The Star is Malaysia’s second-largest English newspaper and has a daily circulation of nearly 300,000. Meanwhile, its website – The Star Online – is among the most popular news sites in the country.

The “Maillard baddies” the article referred to are foods that are products of the Maillard reaction. This reaction takes place when food is fried, grilled, baked or toasted, producing a darkening effect. Examples of this are when bread is baked or toasted, or meat is charred on a grill.


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Readers DigestAdvanced glycation end-products (AGEs) continue to be recognized by the media all over, and that includes some major publications and notable public figures.

Among the numerous sources to have discussed AGEs recently is Reader’s Digest, which has a global circulation of 10.5 million. The June issue of the general interest family magazine featured an article by Joel K. Kahn, M.D. titled, “How to Bounce Back from a Fatty Meal.” The article focused on how to make summer barbecues healthier, and the portion discussing AGEs can be read by clicking on the image to the right.

Another prominent publication to have discussed AGEs recently is Cosmopolitan, which has warned readers about the destructive compounds before. Cosmopolitan is one of the biggest names internationally when it comes to women’s health and beauty, and is read by millions of women around the world.


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Uribarri 2Dr. Jaime Uribarri, a member of the AGE Foundation’s Advisory Board, was featured last month in an article and radio segment by Chicago radio station WBEZ.

The article, “Grilled meats serve up dangerous compounds, but you can avoid some,” was written by Monica Eng. The article also contains the radio spot, titled “Is your BBQ promoting cancer and dementia?”

The article stated:

“Dr Jaime Uribarri of Mount Sinai Medical Center says what matters are the AGEs — the crispy, browned, tasty bits that form on the outside of grilled meat and other foods.  In the kitchen they’re considered flavor, but in most medical labs, Uribarri says, they’re linked to inflammation that causes ‘diabetes, cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, dementia and essentially most of the chronic medical conditions of modern times.’”


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shutterstock_187423169The St. Louis Post-Dispatch recently featured an article stating that a healthy diet – one with low amounts of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) – is a key to healthy, great-looking skin.

Post-Dispatch Fashion Editor Debra D. Bass wrote the article, titled “Eat your way to beautiful skin.” She noted that glycation is one of the causes of poor skin:

“Excess sugar in your bloodstream attaches to proteins to form new molecules called advanced glycation end products (or … wait for it… AGEs for short). According to published studies, the more sugar you eat, the more AGEs you develop and the more likely you are to have inflammation. Inflammation can be a pesky internal condition that means your skin (among other vital organs) is more vulnerable.

And guess what’s most vulnerable to attack: collagen and elastin, the proteins most responsible for keeping your skin plump and youthful.”


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Fruit vs Donuts2Women’s Health writer Laura Tedesco recently authored an article for Fox News titled “Study: Fructose intake linked to slightly higher risk of death.”

She wrote:

“It’s no secret that eating excessive amounts [of] sugar puts you at risk for conditions like obesity and type 2 diabetes. Now, a new study in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggests it may send you to an early grave, too: Women who eat the most sugar have a 10 percent higher risk of dying from any cause, compared to the average person, the researchers found.”

 


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shutterstock_138344483Summertime is upon us, which means that it’s grilling season. Of course, we know that grilling can lead to the formation of harmful advance glycation end-products (AGEs). However, that doesn’t mean you have to give up grilling.

Cardiologist Joel Kahn appeared on Fox 2 News in Detroit to talk about how to make grilling healthier, and also wrote an article for their website titled “A healthier way of grilling.”

Dr. Kahn noted that while eating a plant-based, whole foods diet is one of the healthiest lifestyle choices you can make, that doesn’t mean that your quest for excellent nutrition is complete. That’s because you also have to think about how you prepare your food.


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SugarCubesWe already know that advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are bad news, but now it’s even been confirmed by Mother Nature.

Actually, make that the Mother Nature Network, a website that covers “the broadest scope of environmental news and social responsibility issues on the Internet.”

The website recently featured an article titled “Fighting fine lines? Glycation may be the culprit.”


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Grocery vegetablesBritish publication Daily Mail has been no stranger to advanced glycation end-products, having written a series of articles about them. Now they’ve written another, this one focusing on a new low-AGE diet.

This most recent article, “How you could eat your way to younger skin in 28 days,” was written by Louise Atkinson. She focused on the new book “Younger Skin in 28 Days,” written by nutritionist and skin specialist Karen Fischer. The book presents a 28-day diet for taking years off one’s appearance and improving their overall health.


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shutterstock_160379219Bustle recently featured a column on skincare, specifically focusing on advanced glycation end-products. A women’s website covering news, entertainment, lifestyle and fashion, Bustle previously featured a column on AGEs back in December of 2013.

In this most recent column, columnist Pamela J. Stubbart wrote:

“Allegedly, AGEs are so bad for our skin that we should be counting them instead of calories.

I was skeptical, so I investigated. As it turns out, AGEs are real: animal foods, fatty foods, and heat-processed foods contain the most AGEs. Peer-reviewed scientific evidence suggests that we should indeed take some care to reduce AGEs consumption because they have oxidative and inflammatory effects possibly related to heart disease, diabetes, and other diseases of the developed western world.”

 


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shutterstock_131496704At the AGE Foundation, we’ve informed you of a large variety of advanced glycation end-product (AGE) stories in the media from a wide variety of sources. However, there are a number of other mentions of AGEs in the media that we don’t cover.

For example, while we focus on articles about AGEs, sometimes there are articles about other topics that nevertheless have brief mentions of AGEs. The following are some recent examples of these types of articles.


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shutterstock_107192183Mint, India’s second-largest business newspaper, recently published a dietary article that discussed AGEs and the risks they pose.

Columnist Kavita Devgan, in her article “A very faulty plate,” stressed that moderation is key to staying healthy, and selected specific types of foods that many people consume in excess when they should be doing the opposite.


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ButcherShopDemocrat & Chronicle, a New York-based newspaper, recently published a column discussing AGEs.

Registered dietitian Tami Best wrote the column, titled “Red meat can be part of a healthy diet.” Best was answering the following submitted question: “How often should I eat red meat?”


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shutterstock_156660869The Bangor Daily News, a family-owned newspaper in Maine, just featured an article about dietary AGEs.

The article, “Mix up your cooking methods, avoid sugar for anti-aging benefits,” was written by columnist Georgia Clark-Albert. She is a registered dietitian nutritionist and certified diabetes educator at Penobscot Community Health Care in Bangor.

Clark-Albert wrote:

“Today’s diets contain high levels of harmful compounds called advanced glycation end products, or AGEs, which accumulate in the body over time. All of our cells are affected when too many AGEs build up, a process linked to aging and the development or worsening of chronic illnesses such as Alzheimer’s, cardiovascular and liver diseases. AGEs contribute to increased oxidant stress and inflammation, which also are tied to the epidemic of diabetes.”


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shutterstock_3141845In the recent article “Three worst food mistakes you can make for your skin,” the Oye! Times warned readers about Advanced Glycation End-products and their damaging effect on the skin.

Columnist Aaliya Imtiaz highlighted sugary foods, beverages, and starchy and superior glycemic food items as things in our diet that can harm our skin.

Starting with sugary foods, she stated that foods that are packed with refined carbohydrates and sugar cause blood sugar levels to spike and cause chronic inflammation in the body. This rapid spike damages collagen and elastin – the connective tissue that keeps the skin supple and firm – in a process called glycation, she wrote.

“Whenever you intake sugary foods like chocolates, candies, ice cream, processed foods and condiments, the digested sugar attaches to your collagen in the skin permanently.

“Glycation can worsen your skin conditions. The sugary foods stimulate the production of oil in the skin and pore clogging skin cells shed faster. Research has also revealed that sugar loaded diets encourage premature aging and fine lines. If you are concerned with premature aging then consider the replacement of sugary and processed carbs with fresh vegetables.”


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