Mental StressAs if slowing the aging process and avoiding body-deteriorating habits weren’t enough motivation to stay away from AGEs, more and more scientists are finding a connection between these harmful metabolic byproducts and serious mental illnesses.

The presence of AGEs is often indicative of oxidative stress, which is thought to be a contributing factor in the development of diseases including schizophrenia, ADHD, Parkinson’s, Asperger’s, Alzheimer’s, autism and even cancer. In fact, AGEs are believed to speed up oxidative cell damage, thus accelerating the aging process and increasing the chance of disease development.


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raw meatFor decades, scientists have warned about the dangerous carcinogens associated with grilled foods, but a new study revealed another reason to be wary of overcooking.

The study, completed by the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital, showed that a diet high in glycotoxins called advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) – found in high-concentration in well-done meat – is a risk factor in developing age-related dementia.


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Uribarri 2Mount Sinai Medical Center physician Dr. Jaime Uribarri, a member of the AGE Foundation’s advisory board, was cited in a recent article about a study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.

The article is titled, “New study postulates the role of dietary advanced glycation end products in the risk of Alzheimer’s disease.” The study in question provides evidence that cooking foods at high temperatures increases the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, thanks to advanced glycation end-products (AGEs).


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GirlChoppingTomatoIf you want to improve your health and appearance, various media sources have some advice for you: lower your advanced glycation end-product (AGE) levels.

More and more AGE-related articles have been popping up online in all regions of the world and on websites covering all sorts of topics. The following are some notable recent mentions of AGEs in the media.


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shutterstock_165369422It’s time for another roundup of AGE-related articles that have appeared online recently! These come from various parts of the world (the United States, United Kingdom and India) and from a variety of different sources.

The Strong Body, Strong Mind Connection (Before It’s News): “The control of blood sugar levels through the regular participation in exercise programs can also prevent advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) from forming. These AGE molecules can damage nerve cells and the connections between them, making normal brain function less likely.”


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MagazinePileWant more proof that advanced glycation end-products are being recognized by more and more media outlets? AGEs continue to pop up in articles, blogs and news segments all over the place (like we wrote about here, here and here), and we’ve got another batch of articles to show you.

They come from a variety of sources, including Yahoo!’s Malaysian entertainment website, an online resource for inspiration and spirituality, an organization centered around integrative medicine, a Pakistani newspaper and website, and a beauty and wellness website.

Bacon Gives You Wrinkles: And Six Other Foods That Make You Age (Yahoo! Malaysia Entertainment): “It’s sad news for all the BBQ fans out there, but it turns out BBQs can make you age prematurely. Why? Well, when we cook our meat using dry heat (this includes barbequing) we produce more Advanced Glycation End products (also known as AGEs) in the foods we are cooking. AGEs speed up the ageing process. So, if you want youthful skin, skip the alfresco dining.”


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Readers DigestAdvanced glycation end-products (AGEs) continue to be recognized by the media all over, and that includes some major publications and notable public figures.

Among the numerous sources to have discussed AGEs recently is Reader’s Digest, which has a global circulation of 10.5 million. The June issue of the general interest family magazine featured an article by Joel K. Kahn, M.D. titled, “How to Bounce Back from a Fatty Meal.” The article focused on how to make summer barbecues healthier, and the portion discussing AGEs can be read by clicking on the image to the right.

Another prominent publication to have discussed AGEs recently is Cosmopolitan, which has warned readers about the destructive compounds before. Cosmopolitan is one of the biggest names internationally when it comes to women’s health and beauty, and is read by millions of women around the world.


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Uribarri 2Dr. Jaime Uribarri, a member of the AGE Foundation’s Advisory Board, was featured last month in an article and radio segment by Chicago radio station WBEZ.

The article, “Grilled meats serve up dangerous compounds, but you can avoid some,” was written by Monica Eng. The article also contains the radio spot, titled “Is your BBQ promoting cancer and dementia?”

The article stated:

“Dr Jaime Uribarri of Mount Sinai Medical Center says what matters are the AGEs — the crispy, browned, tasty bits that form on the outside of grilled meat and other foods.  In the kitchen they’re considered flavor, but in most medical labs, Uribarri says, they’re linked to inflammation that causes ‘diabetes, cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, dementia and essentially most of the chronic medical conditions of modern times.’”


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shutterstock_156660869The Bangor Daily News, a family-owned newspaper in Maine, just featured an article about dietary AGEs.

The article, “Mix up your cooking methods, avoid sugar for anti-aging benefits,” was written by columnist Georgia Clark-Albert. She is a registered dietitian nutritionist and certified diabetes educator at Penobscot Community Health Care in Bangor.

Clark-Albert wrote:

“Today’s diets contain high levels of harmful compounds called advanced glycation end products, or AGEs, which accumulate in the body over time. All of our cells are affected when too many AGEs build up, a process linked to aging and the development or worsening of chronic illnesses such as Alzheimer’s, cardiovascular and liver diseases. AGEs contribute to increased oxidant stress and inflammation, which also are tied to the epidemic of diabetes.”


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1394879597_todays-dietitian-march-2014-1The March issue of Today’s Dietitian featured an article on AGEs, and cited the AGE Foundation and multiple members of its Advisory Board.

Titled “Advanced Glycation End Products,” the article was written by Lori Zanteson. Today’s Dietitian is a monthly magazine for nutrition professionals, and according to its website, has a circulation of 40,000 and a readership of 110,000.

Zanteson wrote:

“It’s well-known that overeating and obesity can lead to insulin resistance, triggered by chronically elevated oxidative stress and chronic inflammation. Recent evidence has found that excessive consumption of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), harmful compounds that stem from cooking foods at high temperatures and accumulate in the body as people age, are a major cause of this inflammation that can increase the risk of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.”


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Uribarri 2The website for Channel 9 News in Denver (9NEWS.com) recently featured an article on AGEs and aging, using a study from the AGE Foundation Advisory Board’s Dr. Jaime Uribarri as a source.

The article, “Limit AGEs to Slow Aging,” discussed what is truly in our control when it comes to slowing down the signs of aging. It referenced the report “Advanced glycation end products in foods and a practical guide to their reduction in the diet,” written by Dr. Uribarri, among others.


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shutterstock_159823835A recent PRWeb article highlighted research on the effects that dietary AGEs have on the brain and other facets of one’s health. The article, titled Avoiding Harmful Byproducts of Heat-Processed Foods Protects Against Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease and Diabetes,” stated:

“Advanced glycation endproducts, or AGEs, are compounds commonly found in the so-called ‘Western diet,’ and previously have been linked to increased body weight, diabetes, and possibly Alzheimer’s disease. Now, researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have shown that AGEs also cause brain changes similar to Alzheimer’s disease and pre-diabetes.”


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World Alzheimer’s Awareness Month is dedicated to helping people learn more about Alzheimer’s and its effects. As people become more educated about Alzheimer’s disease and its symptoms, many people wonder how to tell the difference between symptoms of early stages of Alzheimer’s and memory loss associated with the normal aging process.

Forgetting an appointment or wandering around a parking lot looking for your car doesn’t necessarily mean you’re developing Alzheimer’s. Here are a few common scenarios and how to tell the difference:

Normal age-related changes

  • Forgetting to pay a bill by the due date
  • Needing help programming a TV or microwave
  • Forgetting this day it is but remembering it later
  • Not remembering a person’s name
  • Forgetting where you parked your car
  • Forgetting details of an experience
  • Misplacing things, then retracing steps to find the

Symptoms of Alzheimer’s 

  • Inability to budget or manage money
  • Not being able to complete basic tasks around the house
  • Losing track of the month or season
  • Not recognizing a family member or close friend
  • Forgetting how to drive a car
  • Forgetting entire experiences
  • Misplacing things and not being able to retrace steps

If you notice these signs in yourself or a loved one, it’s important to see a doctor as soon as possible. Early detection can help you get the maximum benefit from available treatments.

World Alzheimer’s Awareness month was designated to help increase awareness about the prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease and its social and economic impact. Alzheimer’s disease is a brain disease that causes progressive mental deterioration and eventual fatality. While Alzheimer’s is commonly associated with memory loss and dementia, it affects all aspects of life.

Alzheimer’s Facts 

  • Alzheimer’s disease is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States1
  • An estimated 35.6 million people worldwide have Alzheimer’s disease2
  • More than 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s disease3
  • 1 in 3 people over the age of 85 has dementia4
  • Worldwide, a person develops Alzheimer’s every four seconds5
  • Deaths from Alzheimer’s increased 68 percent between 2000 and 2010; deaths from all other major diseases (heart disease, stroke, prostate cancer, breast cancer, and HIV) decreased5

Alzheimer’s and AGEs

AGEs are significantly higher in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients than those without the disease. Growing evidence suggest that AGE accumulation in the brain causes inflammation. One study also suggested that AGEs create aggregates that interfere with healthy neuron function in the brain.

 

Sources

1Alz.org
2Alzheimersanddementia.com
3Alz.org
4ALz.org
5World Health Organization
6Alz.org

 

Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have been implicated in the chronic complications of diabetes mellitus and have been reported to play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease.

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